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  • Egg binding is not uncommon in birds and may be resolved easily if treated early. Egg binding occurs when the female bird is unable to expel the egg from her body. If a prolonged period has elapsed since the bird began attempting to lay the egg, she may become critically ill. Birds with egg binding may or may not have passed an egg more than 2 days ago, are usually weak, not perching, often sitting low on the perch or on the bottom of the cage, and are straining as if trying to defecate or to lay an egg. Treatment varies depending upon how sick the bird is, as well as the location of the egg and the length of time the bird has been egg bound. Critically ill birds are first treated supportively for shock, and then attempts are made to extract the egg. If your veterinarian cannot see the egg through the vent, surgery under general anesthetic may be necessary to remove the egg from the abdomen. A hysterectomy (removal of the oviduct and uterus) is typically the last choice therapy, when medical and egg extraction through the vent are not possible.

  • Elizabethan collars are designed to help prevent self-mutilation and as a supplementary therapy for feather-destructive birds. Collars may be designed and made by the staff at the veterinary hospital/clinic or commercially made. Collars should only be used when prescribed by an avian veterinarian. Collars are not always safe for every bird.

  • A feather cyst is a malformation of a feather follicle whereby the feather(s) do not exit the skin, and instead become buried in a cyst under the skin. They can become quite large and be painful to the pet. These cysts require veterinary attention and if injured, may bleed extensively.

  • Feather loss occurs either because the bird is truly losing feathers or because the bird, or its cage-mate, is picking out its feathers. Feather-picking is often a behavioral problem, especially in the larger species of birds (such as cockatoos, macaws, and African gray parrots). However, feather loss and feather-picking can also be caused by diseases that result in irritation or pain for the bird, or damage to, or inappropriate growth of feathers. Your veterinarian may have to many perform several diagnostic tests to rule out potential causes. Treatment of feather loss depends on the cause. Feather loss and feather-picking are complicated problems; for specific advice, your bird should have a thorough work-up by a veterinarian familiar with birds.

  • Our knowledge of bird nutrition is constantly evolving both from heightened awareness of the importance of nutrition and from increased research into birds’ different needs. As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals and water. Different species of birds often require different foods.

  • Our knowledge of bird nutrition is constantly evolving. This is due both to heightened awareness of the importance of nutrition and to increased research into birds different needs. As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals and water. Different species of birds often require different foods.

  • As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals, and water. Poor nutrition is a common reason for many health problems in birds. Cockatiels are vulnerable to vitamin A deficiency, insufficient dietary calcium, egg-binding, and other nutrition-related problems. Seeds should only be a very small part of a balanced diet. Fruits, vegetables and greens should account for no more than 20-25% of the daily diet. Pellets are the ideal diet for birds and should ideally represent approximately 75-80% of the bird's diet. Converting seed-eating birds onto a formulated diet is not always easy, taking days, weeks, or months. Consult your veterinarian if you encounter any problems with this transition or with the health of your bird. Placing powdered supplements on the outside of seeds is of little value, since birds remove the outer hulls from seeds before ingesting them. Cockatiels do not need gravel or grit because they remove the outer hull of the seed before ingesting the kernel.

  • As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals, and water. Cockatoos are vulnerable to vitamin A deficiency, high cholesterol, atherosclerosis, stroke, insufficient dietary calcium, egg-binding, and other nutrition-related problems. Seeds are highly palatable and preferred by birds, but nutritionally they are incomplete, lacking vitamins, minerals, and protein. Fruits, vegetables, and greens should account for no more than 20-25% of the daily diet. Pellets are the ideal diet for birds and should ideally represent approximately 75-80% of the bird's diet. Converting seed-eating birds onto a formulated diet is not always easy, taking days, weeks, or months. Consult your veterinarian if you encounter any problems with this transition or with the health of your bird. In general, birds on a pelleted diet do not need supplements. Cockatoos do not need gravel or grit because they remove the outer hull of the seed before ingesting the kernel.

  • As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals, and water. Conures are vulnerable to vitamin A deficiency, insufficient dietary calcium, egg-binding, and other nutrition-related problems. Seeds are highly palatable and preferred by birds, but nutritionally they are incomplete, lacking vitamins, minerals, and protein. Fruits, vegetables, and greens should account for no more than 20-25% of the daily diet. Pellets are the ideal diet for birds and should ideally represent approximately 75-80% of the bird's diet. Converting seed-eating birds onto a formulated diet is not always easy. Consult your veterinarian if you encounter any problems with this transition or with the health of your bird. In general, a bird that is eating 75-80% of its diet in the form of pelleted food does not need supplements. Conures do not need gravel or grit because they remove the outer hull of the seed before ingesting the kernel.

  • As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals, and water. Lovebirds are vulnerable to vitamin A deficiency, insufficient dietary calcium, egg-binding, and other nutrition-related problems. Seeds are highly palatable and preferred by birds, but nutritionally they are incomplete, lacking vitamins, minerals, and protein. Fruits, vegetables and greens should account for no more than 20-25% of the daily diet. The recommended diet for lovebirds is pelleted food formulated for birds and should ideally represent approximately 75-80% of the bird's diet. Converting seed-eating birds onto a formulated diet is not always easy. Consult your veterinarian if you encounter any problems with this transition or with the health of your bird. In general, a bird that is eating 75-80% of its diet in the form of pelleted food does not need supplements. Lovebirds do not need gravel or grit because they remove the outer hull of the seed before ingesting the kernel.